What Are The Key Mental Health Statistics in The U.S.?
MoodRx Clinical Staff - 2024-03-02

What Are The Key Mental Health Statistics in The U.S.?

What Are The Key Mental Health Statistics in The U.S.?

The most current mental health statistics in the United States from resources such as: the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) include:

  1. Prevalence of Mental Illness: An estimated 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. lives with a mental illness. This statistic includes a wide range of mental health conditions, from mild to severe.
  2. Anxiety Disorders: Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults aged 18 and older, or 18.1% of the population every year.
  3. Depression: Major depressive disorder affects approximately 16.1 million American adults, or about 6.7% of the U.S. population aged 18 and older in a given year.
  4. Suicide Rates: Suicide is a major public health concern and the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. The CDC reports that in 2020, there were nearly 46,000 suicides in the United States.
  5. Youth Mental Health: The prevalence of mental health disorders in children and adolescents has been increasing. For instance, rates of anxiety and depression among teenagers have risen significantly over the past decade.
  6. Substance Use and Mental Health: According to SAMHSA, in 2020, 14.2 million adults aged 18 or older had Alcohol Use Disorder, and 8.3 million had an illicit drug use disorder.
  7. Mental Health Services: Despite the high prevalence of mental illness, a significant portion of those affected do not receive treatment. The reasons for this include stigma, lack of access to care, and the cost of treatment. SAMHSA's 2020 survey found that only 44.8% of adults with any mental illness received mental health services in the past year.


These statistics highlight the importance of addressing mental health with the same urgency as physical health, improving access to care, and reducing stigma.